Why I Log Off After an Injustice

and why you may need to as well

Raven J. James

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It’s hard to believe that only a year ago the country was rallying over the loss of George Floyd. Even harder for me to believe is how since that incident, as well as all the ones before and after, Americans still haven’t learned a lesson they so desperately need to understand.

On November 19, 2021, Kyle Rittenhouse was found not guilty in the fatal shooting of two men during protests in Kenosha last year. He was cleared of all five charges related to his actions on August 25, 2020 during protests over the shooting of a Black man (Jacob Blake) by a white police officer.

My feelings toward the verdict are already a heavy load to carry, but what makes it unbearable is the aftermath that ensues every time this happens. Every time justice is not served, every time white supremacist values are blatantly prioritized, the aftermath both online and offline tends to be severe.

Many have already expressed a variation of this statement: “I’m not surprised”. But while people may not be necessarily shocked by the verdict, it doesn’t mean that outrage isn’t the proper response. And maybe that’s exactly why I don’t anticipate seeing any news coverage about riots — or “riots” that are actually just peaceful protests. Whether people were for or against Rittenhouse, a lot of us knew where this trial was headed. And seeing that he was declared innocent of the murders of Black Lives Matter protestors, I don’t see people being enthused about having another protest in which the same thing could potentially happen all over again.

I can only hope and pray that the legacy of the slain protestors — Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber — won’t be reduced to being “looters”.

It’s Okay to Log Off

Engaging on social media straight after such judicial failure is exhausting, it always has been for me. I log off social media for the same reason I no longer watch videos of Black people getting killed: I need to protect my peace.

During a time in which I feel the most helpless, the most insignificant, the most defeated, the best thing for me is to protect my mental and emotional health. I don’t want to be reminded of my social standing in this country, nor do I…

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Raven J. James

Writer | Entrepreneur | Blogger | Dreamer | Pro-Oxford Comma; Feel free to check out my blog at www.serendipityandsuch.com